Jesse Dylan + Creative Commons

Posted by on Oct 15, 2008 in Blog | No Comments

This three-minute film by Jessie Dylan is a wonderful introduction to Creative Commons. Via Lawrence Lessig‘s blog. He rocks.

Lydia Lunch at the Pop Montreal Symposium

Posted by on Oct 3, 2008 in Blog | No Comments

I first learned about Lunch from Angry Women, a book I bought in the early 1990s. In it I met Diamanda Galas, Avital Ronell, Annie Sprinkle, Sapphire, and Susie Bright, among others, who opened to me whole new world of ideas and expanded my sense of what is possible.

In the news: Station C, me & Open Salad

Posted by on Oct 2, 2008 in Blog | No Comments

Isabelle Laporte, a freelance journalist, came to interview us at Sation C. Her story, published in La Presse, focuses on the emerging co-working phenomenon. But the thing I’m most happy about is her mention of Open Salad, which I learned about from my friends at the Centre for Social Innovation and have since championed at […]

Reflections on “I Believe in Open” candidate responses

Posted by on Oct 1, 2008 in Blog | No Comments

I was just browsing through the results section of the ibelieveinopen.ca campaign website. Candidates can respond yes or no to each of the five commitments and post comments, some of which give nice insights into the sort of people you may be voting for. I noticed two things: Andrew Graham, the NDP candidate from New […]

I believe in open: Take a stand for government transparency

Posted by on Oct 1, 2008 in Blog | 2 Comments

I recently joined the advisory board of VisibleGovernment.ca, a non-partisan, non-profit organization that promotes online tools for government transparency in Canada. We’ve just launched our first project — ibelieveinopen.ca — a site that collects pledges from Member of Parliament (MP) candidates to commit to making five improvements to government transparency. The site also collects signups […]

List of qualitative online research methods

Posted by on Oct 1, 2008 in Blog | No Comments

Alecea Standlee, a doctoral student at Syracuse University’s Department of Sociology, has posted a wonderful list of works that deal with qualitative online research methods. She’s also added a few readings that don’t necessarily focus directly on methods, but that may be useful. You can view Alecea’s list on the Association of Internet Researchers mailing […]

Free online access to all SAGE journals until October 31

Posted by on Oct 1, 2008 in Blog | No Comments

Geeks rejoice. SAGE just launched its 500th journal and to celebrate they’re offering free online access to their huge database of social science, humanities, and science, technical, and medical content. This offer covers content from 1999 until October 31, 2008. You’ll need to fill out a form to register.

(B)log On at the Canadian Centre for Architecture

Posted by on Sep 26, 2008 in Blog | 8 Comments

Tomorrow (thanks to Boris, rumor has it | thanks to Patrick) I’m joining Véronique Boisjoly, Michel Hellman, Steven Mansour, and Evan Prodromou, at the CCA‘s (B)log on to Some Ideas event. We’ll be part of a panel, led by Fady Atallah and Mouna Andraos, discussing online media and social activism, with a focus on blogging. (B)log […]

Network mapping and analysis for human rights

Posted by on Jul 23, 2008 in Blog | No Comments

Skye Bender-deMoll’s Network Analysis and Mapping Report (April 2008) examines how network analysis and network mapping can facilitate human rights work. It introduces non-academics to network concepts, gives some examples of this work in practice, discusses risks and challenges, and provides a series of recommendations. The report was prepared for the Science and Human Rights […]

History: A reading list

Posted by on Jul 14, 2008 in Blog | No Comments

My knowledge of history sucks. Badly. This is not good, because understanding what has come before is key to making change now. Luckily, in my travels, I’ve worked with some smart, smart people who love to read history books: Joost Vandenborre and Patrick Meagher.  I harassed them to give me their list “must-read” history books. […]